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Want to Save Money? Hit the Seasonal Sales

One of the best ways to save money is to hit the seasonal sales. 

Sales seem to run in cycles. If you are willing to wait until certain items come on sale, you can save a decent amount of money. Wait to buy the snowblower until after winter has passed. You may have to do a little more shoveling for a little while longer, but you will get a better deal on your snowblower.

Pay attention to seasonal items, and make purchases based on when those items are “out of season.” We save a great deal by purchasing our landscaping plants in the fall. We still had time to plant them before winter, but we paid 50% off the price charged during spring and summer. This works for clothing, outdoor recreational equipment, and a number of other items. Make your purchases when the items aren’t in high demand, and you can save money.

Shopping Holiday Sales

Another option is to shop holiday sales. This weekend is Presidents Day Weekend. Not only does my son have a four-day weekend, but there are sales galore here in town. Presidents Day 2012 Walmart sales, Target sales, furniture store sales, car dealer sales, and other sales are common. You see them wherever you go. And it’s not just Presidents Day. Memorial Day, Fourth of July, and Veterans Day all have their own weekend sales blitzes.

If you have been planning to make a purchase, going during one of these sales can be a way to save money, whether you are purchasing clothing, major appliances, or just about anything else. However, it’s important that you carefully consider your spending plan and make sure that your buying fits in with it.

Even if you are getting a great deal, you’re still spending money. This means that the sale shouldn’t be your reason for going out and making a purchase. Instead, you should only buy things that you have been planning on getting for a while; the sale should be your opportunity to save, rather than an excuse to spend.

And, as you shop the sales, watch out for price anchoring. Many retailers will increase prices before a sale so that they can say something has been “cut.” Be aware that your perception of the deal is often based on this anchoring method that tells you how much something “should” cost. Look at the current cost, and decide whether or not it fits in your budget, and if you think that is your best deal. You want to make sure that you really are going to be getting the best bang for your buck.

As you get ready for the weekend, and as you contemplate maybe going out and hitting a sale or two, make sure that you keep in mind best shopping practices. You don’t want to end up spending more than you should, or blowing your budget. Make a list, buy things you meant to purchase anyway, and try not to be dazzled by the hype.

Image source: The Suss-Man (Mike)

Written by Miranda Marquit

Miranda Marquit is a freelance writer and professional blogger, specializing in personal finance, small business, and investing topics. She writes for a number of financial web sites and blogs, and has been featured in numerous media. Read about life as a freelancer at MirandaMarquit.com and in her book Confessions of a Professional Blogger.

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